Baron is a performance and scalability expert who participates in various database, open-source, and distributed systems communities. He has helped build and scale many large, high-traffic services for Fortune 1000 clients. He has written several books, including O’Reilly’s best-selling High Performance MySQL. Baron has a CS degree from the University of Virginia.

author:

Database

What is Cardinality in a Database?

July 6, 2018

Databases have a lot of jargon, and cardinality is one of those words that experienced people tend to forget that they didn’t know once upon a time. But if you don’t know it—and it takes a while to really get comfortable with cardinality—it’s super …





author:

Database

Hierarchical Observability with RED

November 7, 2017

I’ve written before about the minimal set of metrics that can serve effectively as application/service vital signs. One such set is the RED acronym, which stands for Request Rate, Request Errors, and Request Duration. (I’ll write in the future about what’s missing from this …



author:

Database

Monitoring and Observability With USE and RED

October 5, 2017

Modern systems can emit thousands or millions of metrics, and modern monitoring tools can collect them all. Faced with such an abundance of data, it can be difficult to know where to start looking when trying to diagnose a problem. And when you’re not …



author:

Database

Monitoring Isn’t Observability

September 14, 2017

Observability is all the rage, an emerging term that’s trending up very quickly in certain circles even while it remains unknown in others. As such, there isn’t a single widely understood meaning for the term, and much confusion is inevitably following. What is observability? …


author:

Database

Meet The New DBA, Different From The Old

August 18, 2017

There’s a rapid shift taking place in today’s technology organizations: the role of the DBA is being redefined and increasingly replaced by other roles and specialties. This is happening even as data explodes—in fact, it’s happening precisely because data is exploding. It’s a trend …