Security

The Soft Skills Gap Is Real; Nontechnical Skills Needed By Every Federal IT Pro

The Soft Skills Gap Is Real; Nontechnical Skills Needed By Every Federal IT Pro

Today’s federal IT pro has a broad range of responsibilities and corresponding talents. The need for a multidisciplinary skillset is only increasing. As environments get more complex and teams grow, federal IT pros will need a broader range of skills—specifically, “soft skills” or “people skills.” These types of additional skills have the potential to help solidify job security and help make the federal IT pro more invaluable.

Soft skill requirements

Communication, collaboration, and adaptability are the cornerstones of a strong, productive team—hence, three of the most desirable “soft skills” the federal IT pro can develop and grow.

Communication

When a project is created—and must be planned, tested, and executed—it’s critically important to have the ability to communicate project goals, strategy, planning, timelines, testing, implementation, and ongoing maintenance to everyone on the team, regardless of technical specialty.

Each group within the team should have an understanding of the criticality of the project, as well as its nontechnical goals as it relates to the agency’s mission. Communication is the key to achieving this goal. Federal IT pros must be able to communicate not only within the team but to others within the organization as well.

Most agencies have some combination of technical folks and business folks. A technical staffer who can explain how a technical project will help drive agency mission or business goals will likely have a successful career. Additionally, a technical staffer who can also explain the financial impact—ideally, the long-term cost-savings impact of many of today’s leading-edge technology projects—is likely to have an even more successful career.

Collaboration

Different agency groups will need to work together to ensure project success. According to the 2019 SolarWinds® Federal Cybersecurity Survey Report, a majority of security issues are born of user error. In fact, 56% of respondents say careless untrained insiders are a significant source of IT security threats in their agencies.

Based on those statistics, if an agency wants to enhance its security posture, collaborating with the rest of the agency will likely be a critical component of the project’s success.

The federal IT team can work with the agency’s internal communications team to implement an awareness or education program to ensure all agency personnel are informed—and are doing their part in the broader agency effort.

Adaptability

As every federal IT pro knows, change is constant. Whether the change is related to budget issues, administration changes, technology advancements, or a combination of all three, the ability to function in this type of changing environment is becoming increasingly important.

Critical thinking skills are a significant part of adaptability. As things change, federal IT pros must be able to shift thinking quickly and effectively. Critical thinking skills include problem identification, research, objective analysis, and the ability to draw conclusions and make decisions.

The final piece of adaptability is the willingness to change. It’s important to embrace change and thrive in this type of environment. A willingness—even eagerness—to learn new technologies, take on new challenges, and think differently will almost certainly ensure a long, successful career in the federal IT workforce.

Conclusion

Gone are the days of silo-based IT skills. Communication, collaboration, and adaptability will soon be job requirements within the federal IT workforce, even for the most technical staffers.

Find the full article on Government Technology Insider.


Mav Turner is the vice president of product for the network management portfolio and Orion® Platform at SolarWinds. Prior to his current role, Mav held various positions within SolarWinds, including senior sales engineer and senior product manager. Mav has worked in IT management for 20 years, including positions in both network and systems management before joining the SolarWinds team in 2009. Mav has a BS in Computer Science from Texas State University.